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There are more jobs than people out of work.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in April there were 6.7 million job openings and just 6.4 million available workers to fill them.  As the demand grows, however, workers are more confident about moving between employers and talent wars will naturally escalate.   April marked the second month in a row that there were more vacancies than available hires, a phenomenon that had not happened before 2018.  Despite the mismatch, sizeable wage gains remain elusive, with average hourly earnings up just 2.7 percent over the past year.

The full article: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/05/there-are-more-jobs-than-people-out-of-work.html

See new search for: 

Director Clinical Affairs

 

Preparing for a job interview is a key factor of success in any job search.  To prepare for a job interview, however, candidates must understand how to respond to behavioral interviewing.  One of the most common mistakes people make in interviews is failing to answer these clearly, concisely and with confidence.

Behavioral interviewing is a technique used to probe into the candidate’s inner-self, motivation, adaptability, etc.  These questions help interviewers better understand how a candidate developed and applied a skill, ability, or character trait in their pursuit of a successful outcome of a project or task in a previous role.  Specific, open-ended questions can be asked that requires candidates to give detailed answers, and thus, will provide insights as to how a potential candidate might approach and overcome a particular challenge.  Please also see my article, Predicting Candidates’ Success. 

Standing out in a crowd - Behavioral InterviewingSome behavioral questions might be:

“Tell me about a time when you were given a challenging project or task with an unreasonable timeline.

What did you do?”

“Tell me about a time when you were given an assignment that was beyond your comfort-level, skills, and/or experience?  What did you do?  Were you successful?  Did you grow professionally as a result?  How?”

A candidate’s answers to these questions will help an interviewer understand whether this person has the personality, attitude, aptitude, and experience to succeed in their company and culture.  Each company, however, has developed its own culture over time (Please see Company Culture).  Thus, in crafting their responses, candidates should take into account a company’s culture whenever possible.

Your answers will also allow the interviewer to gauge your ability and comfort in constructing a concise, intelligible and credible story.   At some point in your career,  you may need to speak in front of senior managers, peers, clients, etc.  To be seen as articulate and professional, will be critical to your progressive career in future roles within this company.

Preparation is Key to Acing a Job Interview

Good Luck

Jim Lynch PhD

Exactly eight years after the Great Recession ended, the U.S. job market has settled into a sweet spot of steadily solid growth,” according to AP (6/1, Boak).  AP added, “the 4.4 percent unemployment rate matches a decade low,” and, “many people who had stopped looking for jobs are coming off the sidelines to find them.” The article states that “all told, it’s evidence of an American economy that is running neither too hot nor too cold, with growth holding at a tepid but far from recessionary 2 percent annual rate.”

For complete article, visit http://www.startribune.com/us-job-market-looks-solid-8-years-after-recession-ended/425728393/

 

Have you ever made the wrong hire?

There are 3 significant, but sometimes intangible, issues to consider when hiring – time, money and morale. I will address time & money here, and morale in next article.

According to a recent Society for Human Resource Management’s (SHRM’s) Human Capital Benchmarking Report, it can cost up to $4,129 (cost-per-hire) to land a new employee. In the current economic times, however, companies can’t afford to miss out on great talent, and perhaps more importantly, make the wrong hire.

Time kills deals, and recruiting momentum is no different. Companies that drag out the process, usually can end up with less-then-perfect hires at higher prices. Sensing a prolonged hiring process, top performers will drop out of the pool within days or weeks, for example, thus reducing the quantity and quality within the talent pool. Only individuals with fewer options or little time to seek alternatives, will remain actively engaged in the process. And of those candidates who stay in the process, cost to hire them can increase substantially as a result of negotiating higher offers in order to outbid the competition.

By outsourcing recruiting to an experienced recruiting firm, a company can drastically improve the speed, reduce costs and drive successful hiring campaigns. Recruiting firms are faster and more efficient, in part, because they recruit every day. The best recruiting firms, however, must also stay on top of latest tools & techniques. And finally, they must stay abreast of the changing needs of their clients, as well as, the daily shifts in the marketplace of top talent.

James F. Lynch PhD, MBA, CSP
President