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There are more jobs than people out of work.  According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in April there were 6.7 million job openings and just 6.4 million available workers to fill them.  As the demand grows, however, workers are more confident about moving between employers and talent wars will naturally escalate.   April marked the second month in a row that there were more vacancies than available hires, a phenomenon that had not happened before 2018.  Despite the mismatch, sizeable wage gains remain elusive, with average hourly earnings up just 2.7 percent over the past year.

The full article: https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/05/there-are-more-jobs-than-people-out-of-work.html

See new search for: 

Director Clinical Affairs

 

Here is an insightful blog on Time Management by one of the most efficient business minds I know—Jim Gano.  Enjoy! – Dr. James Lynch

Guest Insighter

Jim Gano 

March 14, 2018

 

Answering the question “How do you get it all done?”

I can’t even venture a guess at how many times I get asked the question “How do you get it all done?” or my personal favorite “Is there anything you don’t do?” to which I often jokingly reply, “yes, sleep!” I own a business with five separate and distinct divisions, including awards, signs, custom imprinted apparel, promotional items and varsity jackets, almost like having five companies in one. I also host a weekly radio show, called “Takin’ Care of Business.” I announce local high school football and basketball games. I am a freelance announcer. I emcee several fundraising events every year for local charities and organizations. I am a writer. I am a husband and a father. And I consult with and speak to numerous businesses on how to make their operations more efficient, improve productivity and return them to profitability. I also volunteer on several committees/boards in my community. As you can see my plate is pretty full. And I wouldn’t have it any other way.

Sometimes when asked how do I get it all done, I am confused by the question. I get it done because I have to. My day starts at 5am when I wake up and I start prioritizing the top five things I need to do that day. There will be many more things that have to get done, but these five are the “must do’s” of the day. I get it done because I set goals and times for things to be finished and just like President Jed Bartlett, on the TV show “The West Wing” as soon as I am done with one task I ask, “What’s next?” though I don’t reference Mrs. Lanigham, then I move onto the next task.

Recently, one woman really pressed me for an answer when I was a guest speaker at a Women in Business luncheon talking about ‘marketing and promoting your business’ and said “I really want to know how you do it all.” And it didn’t seem like she was going to let me off the hook until I answered her. So I said, “I make time for everything, I prioritize tasks (even color code them) and delegate what others on my staff can do so I can focus on those things that only I can handle, and I don’t take on more than I can handle. If it is important to you, you will find a way to get it all done. Some days my calendar looks more like a kaleidoscope than a day planner, but not always. When there is a conflict in my schedule I try to reschedule something or if I can’t, I pick the one I deem most important and decline the second (or third or fourth). I may miss a favorite TV show while I prepare my radio show, but that is why I have a DVR, I’ll catch the show later. I may stay up later one night or get up early to work on something, but again if I deem it important, I’ll find a way to get it done.” She snarked, “Your wife must love that.” I told her “I am home almost every night for dinner, I spend time with her and our kids if they are home, we might watch a few TV shows or talk each night, but eventually if I need to get something done, I will excuse myself and do it, then return if time allows.

Again, it all comes down to what is important to you. My family is most important to me and I try never to let my work interfere with that. I realized a long time ago that there is much more time in the day if you use it wisely. I could fool around on the internet, or watch TV shows until my eyes cross, but those things aren’t as important to me as being with my family, building my business and making sure my employees have plenty of work to do to keep them employed. They are the backbone of my business and what allows me to do those other things I enjoy.

Years ago when I was asked why I do so much by someone I explained to them that when we die our headstone will have our name on it along with the date we are born and the date we died. In between those two dates will be a dash. That dash represents everything we did from the day we were born until the day we left this earth. I’m just filling up the dash. Sometimes when my wife or my friends ask me what I am doing at a particular moment I’ll tell them, “Just filling the dash.” And they all know what that means.

The takeaway here is simple. Do what is important to you. Don’t procrastinate. Make the time. Do it today, not tomorrow and you will be surprised how much more you can do with your extra time. Then, find something else to do, time with family, friends, travel, a hobby, volunteer, you pick, it’s your life.

But, never stop filling up your dash.

 

Jim Gano is an award winning business consultant and owner of Crown Trophy of Flemington an award retailer specializing in awards for corporate recognition and athletic and academic achievement. Additionally, the company has three other divisions, a full service sign shop, a promotional products division, and a custom imprinted apparel division. Gano also hosts a weekly radio show called “Takin’ Care of Business” which can be heard at noon (Eastern) every Thursday by logging onto www.hunterdonchamberradio.com or on WHCR-DB

Would you like to be a Guest Insighter? If so, please send a sample article to [email protected] for consideration. Please note that we can reciprocate by composing articles for your site or publication. 

Preparing for a job interview is a key factor of success in any job search.  To prepare for a job interview, however, candidates must understand how to respond to behavioral interviewing.  One of the most common mistakes people make in interviews is failing to answer these clearly, concisely and with confidence.

Behavioral interviewing is a technique used to probe into the candidate’s inner-self, motivation, adaptability, etc.  These questions help interviewers better understand how a candidate developed and applied a skill, ability, or character trait in their pursuit of a successful outcome of a project or task in a previous role.  Specific, open-ended questions can be asked that requires candidates to give detailed answers, and thus, will provide insights as to how a potential candidate might approach and overcome a particular challenge.  Please also see my article, Predicting Candidates’ Success. 

Standing out in a crowd - Behavioral InterviewingSome behavioral questions might be:

“Tell me about a time when you were given a challenging project or task with an unreasonable timeline.

What did you do?”

“Tell me about a time when you were given an assignment that was beyond your comfort-level, skills, and/or experience?  What did you do?  Were you successful?  Did you grow professionally as a result?  How?”

A candidate’s answers to these questions will help an interviewer understand whether this person has the personality, attitude, aptitude, and experience to succeed in their company and culture.  Each company, however, has developed its own culture over time (Please see Company Culture).  Thus, in crafting their responses, candidates should take into account a company’s culture whenever possible.

Your answers will also allow the interviewer to gauge your ability and comfort in constructing a concise, intelligible and credible story.   At some point in your career,  you may need to speak in front of senior managers, peers, clients, etc.  To be seen as articulate and professional, will be critical to your progressive career in future roles within this company.

Preparation is Key to Acing a Job Interview

Good Luck

Jim Lynch PhD

Four in 10 workers (41%) say they would accept more paid vacation time in lieu of a pay raise if given the choice, according to surveys of 733 human resource managers and 2,062 employees.  While 70% of workers consider paid vacation time a right of employment, rather than a benefit, a significantly lower number of employers (58%) share that view. Additionally, more than one-third (39%) of workers consider their company’s paid vacation plan inferior to that of comparable industry competitors. These gaps underscore the critical connection between vacation time and job satisfaction, and the importance for employers and employees to find a mutually-beneficial compromise.

See full article at – http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/time-is-money-nearly-half-of-workers-would-take-extra-vacation-time-over-a-pay-raise-300497673.html

 

 

By 2025, PhRMA reports US Pharmaceutical jobs could be 60% vacant from a lack of effective education policies coupled with growing competition from other countries.  A robust STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) workforce is absolutely crucial to the future of the biopharmaceutical sector.

How has the US reached this point?

The Pharmaceutical industry is research intensive, and all aspects from R&D to manufacturing require highly-skilled workers. This shortage of skills will get worse as drug development gets more complicated.  US Government shoulders some blame by neglecting education in these areas, just as competitors including Australia and China have been ramping up their efforts. In 2016, China had 4.7 million recent STEM graduates, compared to just 568,000 in the US.

According to vice president of policy and research at PhRMA Anne Pritchett, there is a real danger the country’s pharmaceutical industry could fall behind its competitors if nothing changes: “Research and Development (R&D) intensive industries like ours could be located in any country. If we get to a point where the policies and the STEM workforce in another country outweigh what we have in the US, there’s a real fear that we will lose our competitive edge.”

Pritchett points to a few keys areas where US needs to be able to analyse the increasing amount of ‘Big Data’ in order to assess efficacy, safety, as well as, real world evidence in developing new medicines.

To access the full report and to learn about STEM education policies in the US, please follow link below:

http://www.pharmaceutical-technology.com/features/featureclosing-the-us-pharmaceutical-industrys-growing-skills-gap-5885395/

 

 

Everyone finds themselves in a rut in their career sooner or later.  Is it time for a new job?  Maybe a new career?  Here are some insights and questions one should ask oneself…  See today’s Fortune article: http://fortune.com/2017/06/21/dev-bootcamp-knowing-when-to-quit/

 

 

Dr. Lynch speaking at Leadership Hunterdon Graduation Class of 2017

Leadership Hunterdon Consulting Team (LHCT) recently released its findings regarding tech sector growth opportunities in Hunterdon County: “A Case and Framework for Tech Sector Growth in Hunterdon County” – see full report link below.

I had the privilege of speaking at the Graduation Dinner on behalf of, and as a graduate of, the Leadership Hunterdon Class 2017.

Overview:  The Leadership Hunterdon Consulting Team (LHCT) reviewed the feasibility of creating and growing a sustainable Tech Sector in Hunterdon County, as well as, strategies to attract technological resources and a high-tech workforce to the County.

The population in Hunterdon County is aging, while Millennials are moving out of the county due to a variety of reasons, including a lack of high-wage, quality jobs. LHCT believes there is a vast and immediate opportunity in the technology sector for the following reasons: (1) higher paying jobs, (2) attracts the younger generation, (3) a small physical footprint, and (4) crosses multiple sectors.

A Technological Center will have an immediate, positive impact on economic development within the County by creating new, high-wage jobs and a better way of life for those attracted to these jobs.  Nourishing a technology cluster in the county will encourage a younger, financially secure population to work, play, and live in the county. A small but growing tech sector already exists in the county, but has been disjointed and lacks networking and growth opportunities.  A concerted, dedicated effort to grow and sustain these existing tech companies and individuals is necessary.  Developing shared work spaces, for example, will help bring the technology and the minds driving it together by provide a platform for nascent technologies to “incubate.”

The LHCT concluded that the county is well-suited and ready to make this a reality and grow it with a long-term, multivariable effort to further develop and sustain this sector.

 

Click on image below to access the complete report and findings of the White Paper

 

There are many negative implications of a poor hire, but one not readily recognized is its impact on a company’s reputation, inside and out. The wrong hire can be viewed externally, as well as, internally as a red flag about a company.

Your Company’s Reputation

As the economy rebounds and competition for top performers intensifies, companies cannot afford to make the wrong hire, especially when trying to attract Millennials. Even a bad experience by a potential candidate, whether hired or not, can impact a company’s reputation. And in this day of social media, these situations can have instant & far-reaching effects on candidates, employees and a company’s workplace.

In an effort to avoid wrong hire, companies are beginning to pay greater attention to the candidate’s experience from the beginning of the hiring process. Companies that actively engage all parties in the process, tend to identify and attract the right candidates quickly, and therefore, hire the best talent. The recruiting firm needs to be part of this process from the beginning. The recruiting firm can bring an objective perspective, streamline the process, and in most cases, can bring best practices to their clients.

A well-developed and efficient hiring process, will keep everyone aligned throughout the process, and will allow the recruiter and the company to develop a positive relationship with the potential candidate built on mutual trust.

This will drastically decrease the probability of a wrong hire!

Please follow me on LinkedIn:  www.linkedin.com/in/presidentregionalpersonnel

 

Exactly eight years after the Great Recession ended, the U.S. job market has settled into a sweet spot of steadily solid growth,” according to AP (6/1, Boak).  AP added, “the 4.4 percent unemployment rate matches a decade low,” and, “many people who had stopped looking for jobs are coming off the sidelines to find them.” The article states that “all told, it’s evidence of an American economy that is running neither too hot nor too cold, with growth holding at a tepid but far from recessionary 2 percent annual rate.”

For complete article, visit http://www.startribune.com/us-job-market-looks-solid-8-years-after-recession-ended/425728393/

 

Three out of four U.S. adults (75%) have never heard of the term “gig economy,” according to the results of a new American Staffing Association Workforce Monitor® survey conducted by Harris Poll. Roughly three in 10 Americans (29%) don’t know how to define the term, and 31% cannot identify specific types of gig work.

Without a definition, most U.S. adults (85%) say they may have performed work one might consider “gig” at some point in the past. However, after being given a definition that describes gigs as various forms of small-project, freelance assignments typically facilitated by an internet platform or app, that percentage drops to 20%, the survey results show.  A large majority of Americans (78%) see the gig economy as a new way to describe the kind of nontraditional work arrangements that have been around a long time. More than half (53%) disagree that the U.S. will evolve to predominantly a gig economy within the next 20 years.

To read to full article, please follow link below:

https://d2m21dzi54s7kp.cloudfront.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/ASA-Workforce-Monitor-Gig-Economy-Summary-Report.pdf